First Foot

First Foot

During the first public live art event produced by The Stove, the public was invited to view a rolling programme of large scale sound and video projections onto the front facade of the Stove building, using the pedestrianised area in front as a free auditorium, meeting space and street food venue. Over the two evenings an estimated audience of 1,300 to 1,700 people of all ages attended, most staying for at least an hour or more.

The artists created a series of works with a First Foot theme designed to introduce the people of Dumfries to The Stove. Five very different projection pieces were shown: from John Wallace’s stunning images collected from around the area to Chris Helson and Sarah Jackets’ recreation of the last few minutes of the iconic film Close Encounters of the Third Kind. The bemused humans returning to earth in the spaceship emerged to hand out vacuum packed black bun to an equally bemused but appreciative audience. The Lost Supper was a piece of performance art by Mark Zygadlo, Oceanallover and Mischief la Bas which featured the Marquis de Sade madly searching for a Burns Supper.

The Stove was one of the many community groups to take part in the first Big Burns Supper Festival. We invited local people to submit ideas for a film they could make to project on the building – 5 people made brand new films specially for the event and plenty of others were sent in ranging from cameraphone clips to professional films. A team of about 20 volunteers helped transform the building into a giant cinema screen and helped staff the space for the audience.

First Foot gave amazing opportunities for local people to show what they could do and to learn new skills – it proved to be the foundation for the way The Stove was to operate through getting groups of people together to make community events in public. First Foot ran over 27th and 28th January, over the two evenings an estimated audience of 1,300 to 1,700 people of all ages attended, most staying for at least an hour or more. People commented on how good it was to see so many people using the square and on the really high quality of the artwork ‘the sort of thing you’d usually see in Glasgow or Edinburgh’