Categories
Musings News

2021: The Stove at 10 Years

‘For me, the question of democracy also opens up the question of what does it mean to be truly human. And it seems to me that we need to recognize that to develop the best humanity, the best spirit, the best community, there needs to be discipline, practices of exploring. How do you do that? How do we work together? How do we talk together in ways that will open up our best capacities and our best gifts?’

Vincent Harding

Looking back, looking forward

Our first foot into the New Year might seem like little has changed. With a new spike rolling in with the first snowfall of January, a third lockdown begins. And as we huddle further into our little worlds the news cycle spins and bounces off the walls with the discovery of a vaccine. And for now, we carry on.

2021 marks ten years of the Stove’s work. And we’re immensely proud of what’s been achieved in that time; from festivals and events to community buy-outs and river races. Together with our community, we’ve shaped a new vision not only for the arts but also for the vital role that communities and creativity play in the shaping of our town.

This year, we’re focused on sharing and learning together again so that we can build and support new and ambitious ideas from the voices hitherto unheard across the region.

As of December, the Stove has been focused on building a programme of new projects that will allow us to delve deeper into connecting communities, ideas and creativity together. We want to build new connections, routes and opportunities for learning across our membership and wider region.

This year we want to discover new voices, train and support new ideas as well as deepen our relationship to the places beyond the town center.

We will do this by:

  • Creating new spaces for people to learn, share and take part in conversations to map the future of our region.
  • Continuing to explore and promote bold and innovative projects that connect people in a time of social isolation.
  • Finding the new stories and storytellers to help us navigate a world spinning further out of reach.
  • Focusing on localism and power by providing the tools necessary for communities to realise and shape their identities and futures.

Our programme will stretch across sharing skills in digital communication to help communities and artists reach further and more meaningfully to people, regional projects to support bold ideas concerned with community ownership and place-making and a responsive series of events and conversations open to all.

We are committed to exploring, developing and sharing how we work with other places and people and to continue the conversation online through our new podcast channel and other outlets.

Throughout January the Stove will be planning and organizing for the year ahead, so we encourage you to keep an eye on our website and social media for announcements, job opportunities and activity.

We’d like to once again thank our membership and community who have helped to shape our ideas for the year ahead by taking part in our projects, events, consultations and conversations throughout 2020.

And to celebrate ten years of the Stove we’ll be sharing the stories of those who have come through our doors, sharing their favourite memories as well as finding out what lies next for us over the next 10 years.

Whilst the road ahead looks rough, we’re hopeful our work will cement a new vision of community and creativity that seeks to support a fairer society for all. We can’t wait to see what comes of it.

Categories
Musings News Projects

Dark Time: An Update

We’ve reached the end of our annual Stove Dark Time, following three weeks of conversations, discussions and reflecting on the past year. A key focus of this year’s Dark Time was incorporating into our plans for next year the feedback from our Community & Membership Survey. This survey helped us to learn more about our membership and what we mean to our wider community so that we can continue to consider better ways of working together. We received incredibly thoughtful and rich responses, which have laid the foundations for our team discussions during Dark Time. These will feed into our plans for next year in order help us make more informed decisions for the future of The Stove, Dumfries and the wider region. Although so much is still in the planning stage, here is an update on key areas we are exploring and developing:

  • We are looking at how our core team can be re-structured to support a deeper culture of opportunities for our membership to be involved in the direction of The Stove and, in particular, how the Curatorial Team model will evolve to achieve this.
  • We are reflecting on our commissioning process, the types of opportunities we support, the language we use to communicate opportunities and our processes for selection. We also want to explore ways in which we can open up our interview process and make it more accessible.
  • We want to increase the opportunity for interaction between members by creating spaces for our members to mingle such as networking days, coffee mornings, workshops and in general, more occasions for members to come and bounce ideas off the Stove team and each other.
  • We want to be ambitious in our programming and are exploring how we can remain responsive and targeted in an ever-changing environment. In particular we are continuing to look at The Stove’s regional focus, which was a core theme of membership responses to the survey. This work was already on-going with the Embers work, but is an even sharper focus for The Stove now.
  • We are deep in conversation about The Stove’s role as a learning organisation and are committed to exploring how this might work. We know already that we want to help increase opportunities for skills sharing and up-skilling across the region as well as to explore how members can learn from each other and will be taking this forward into next year and beyond.

While we are still in the early stages for much of what is mentioned above, we have already achieved a great deal through discussion and planning over the previous few weeks and are excited to build on this and see how a shared vision can be implemented. Dark Time has also helped us to touch base, reacquaint ourselves with our core values and place our members at the heart of what we do. We will keep members updated on progress on this through news updates on the website, members emails, the next AGM and specific events as appropriate. Your input into The Community & Membership Consultation was pivotal to this success and thank you again for taking the time to provide your thoughts.

Categories
Musings

Quarter-Life Crisis: Where was Martin Joseph O’Neill at 25?

By Hayley Watson

Feeling secure in your 20s is tricky at the best of times, and our generation are lucky to have a housing crisis, yet another recession and a global pandemic punctuating our continued ‘coming-of-age’ panic. Add a desire to pursue a creative career into the mix – if you’re reading this I don’t need to tell you how unstable this can feel because you likely already know – and you’ve got a recipe for a real headf..iasco. This interview is part of a series where I ask established creative professionals, people you and I might view as ‘real adults’, what they were doing at 25. I have my suspicions that they were probably as confused then as we are now and I’m determined to prove it.

This time around, I spoke with Stove curatorial member Martin O’Neill. Martin is a Dumfries-based artist, writer and producer and hosts The Stove’s monthly open mic night, Brave New Words. Looking back at his 25th year, Martin reflects on leaky flats, cats and the power of language.

 

Tell us a bit about yourself and where you’re at now!

I’m a multi-disciplinary artist, writer and producer who’s trying to find a less pompous way of describing himself.

I live in Dumfries, born and bred.

As a ‘practice’, I’m interested in spaces, people, stories and inviting the imagination in. I’m sort of all over the place in that. But it’s usually about telling, and inviting the stories, that are often unheard, undervalued, or underappreciated. I also want people to have fun and share unique experiences together, even if it’s not in the way that I might have planned or predicted. All the better if that’s the case.

 

You were 25 between 2015 and 2016 There’s a lot going on in the world in 2020, but what was happening in 2015 and 2016? What’s the biggest news event you can remember from this time?

I can’t really recall what happened last week, so five years ago is sort of like a half-remembered dream, foggy snapshots of bad lager, cash in hand jobs, leaky roofs and 3AM jam sessions. That said, I cheated, and a quick Google search reminds me that the atrocious Charlie Hedbo attacks in Paris happened in January of that year and 2016 brought with it a new raft of misery in Brexit, Trump, the death of David Bowie and the Pulse nightclub shootings in Orlando. I remember quite vividly the news of the shootings in Orlando. As a gay man, this was particularly devastating. Shaking me to my core, it brought with it a stark reminder of the work yet still needing to be done in the fight for LGBT rights across the world, and a shiver that it could well have been me in that room.

Where were you living? Who with?

I was sharing a leaky 3 bed flat with two female musicians at the time. And a cat. And then several more cats (she had kittens).

 

Did you have a job? What was it?

I had started as a CT member at the Stove Network in, I believe, May/June of 2015. I was also working 7 days a week in the magnificent Coach & Horses.

 

Is there something you did when you were 25 that no one knows about?

Mostly everything I did at that time in my life was pretty public, either in a desperate attempt at notoriety or just the nature of what I was up to. Gigs, Brave New Words, installations, it was all there in the public domain, and still is, in all their amateur glory thanks to social media. Some awful graphic design was done in that time. And poetry. Bad, bad poetry.

 

What was your dream job at the time?

Whatever it was, it was usually about wanting to tell stories, so whether that meant being a poet, novelist, folk musician or dramatist, it revolved around that constant need to keep writing. I was also beginning to explore my practice as a visual artist and designer. At the time, I was way too conscious of the ‘27’ Club. Not so much for the untimely tragedy that befell them, but how much, and the quality of the work, their elite members had achieved in the time it took me to get a flat, find some steady paid work and land the occasional gig for extra cash.

 

If you had to choose one memory from your 25th year, what would it be?

The first Brave New Words. A really special night where some mad idea that folk might want to hear poetry together actually paid off. Who’da thunk?

 

If you could tell your 25-year-old self one thing, what would you say? And what do you think your 25-year-old self would say to you?

To my 25 year old self: You should be writing.

My 25 year old self to me now: You should be writing.

 

 

Are you where your 25-year-old self thought you’d be now?

 The last five years are such a blur of anxiety and chaotic thinking, that any thought of where I’d be in five years was clouded by some self-imposed pressure to complete something so short-term I can’t even recall what it might have been. Turning 30, that pressure seems to have eased off a little bit. You never do your best work when you’re worried about how you might be perceived. It’s better to just get on with it. And if it fails, move on, fail better.

We sometimes focus too much on success and forget how much our failures help us grow. What were your biggest failures from back then?

Too many to name. Mostly to do with poor communication. Mostly every problem is down to that. Just make sure you’re on the same page as others.

 

Finally, do you have any ‘words of wisdom’ for the 20-somethings reading this?

It’s not that far away from me so take this with a pinch of salt, I’m barely 30 as it is! But I suppose there’s an energy in your mid-twenties that’s really powerful, especially when you’re working with other, often older, more experienced people. You’re questioning, provoking, challenging and you’ve all the time in the world.  And that is so important. Be loose. Be creative. Make the mistakes and don’t overthink everything. But be mindful of others lives. Everyone has something to bring to the table. Everywhere. Also, language is a really powerful thing. Don’t let others use it to disempower you or make you feel small. But also, don’t play into those hands in thinking that is the ‘norm’ and adopting those same bad behaviours, it’s not, and it’ll bite you in the ass one day. Make sure to step outside of yourself every once in a while. There’s a whole world of lives herein, allow yourself to be passive. That’s when the best ideas come.

Categories
Musings News Projects

Dark Time 2020

This November is our annual Dark Time. Over the course of the next two weeks we’ll be working hard, thinking, planning and implementing some of the biggest projects we’ve ever dreamt up. It’s also a time for us to question our role, our processes, communication and vision fully so that we might step into the New Year resourced, ready and receptive to whatever it might bring.

Dark Time is a chance for the team to take a step back and reflect, to listen and plan for the year ahead. It is a significant and valuable process where we take a critical and constructive eye over everything we do, through an intensive series of conversations and workshops. We’ll discuss everything from projects and production, events and hospitality, festivals and gigs to the way we use our café, connect and work with our membership as well as explore further our role within the region, and to question, adapt and embed a vision for the organisation to share for the year coming.

2020, perhaps more so than previous years, has brought a lot into focus for us, as it has for many. From the delivery of our events, our digital programme and our engagement with new audiences and collaborators, as well our commitment to creating and sustaining grassroots activity which narrows the gaps (or gulfs) between art, creativity, government and community.

It’s been a tough year all round. But it stands as testament to the commitment we feel to what we do. We’ve had to re-imagine our entire 2020 programme for an online audience as well as manage projects and festivals throughout the country, alongside shaping the conversations on artists and communities at a national level. Rather than limiting our focus for the year coming, we believe this time to be invaluable in helping to shape new projects out-with Dumfries, and to re-fresh our ideas in shaping a fairer future for our region, through the sharing of art, ideas and gifts from the voices all too often unheard in our communities.

2020 if nothing else, has proven what is possible at a distance, such as working from home and the ability to connect with a broader spectrum of society than we ever thought possible. But it has deprived us all of the experiences which colour our lives, connect us with one another and help us to understand, navigate and continue in a world spinning further out of sight.  But we’re far from pessimistic. Instead, we’ll think of this year as fallowed ground for something so much bolder, brighter and connected than we ever have been before.

Our recent membership survey has given us a lot to talk about. From our engagement with the community, the way we communicate, how diverse we are and how focused we ought to become in our vision. Our Dark Time this year is framed on the ideas, suggestions and feedback we have received from our members and wider community over this year, and we cannot thank you enough in helping to shape the Stove with us over this time. Whether it’s through a coffee in the café, filling out the membership survey, engaging in our programme of digital events or dropping us a line to check-in. Every conversation is meaningful, especially those of dissent.

The work here now is to recognise where we are and what we now need to do as an organisation so as to connect, inspire and grow new visions for our community in the wake of an international pandemic. A vision fully shared, that is inclusive, welcoming and principled. This may mean many things, and it may take strange and exciting new shapes, but as always and even more so, they are guided by the values shaped by, with and for the communities we belong to and serve.


Our Dark Time is framed around three conversations, and we’ll be sharing our progress with you through our social media and website as we go.

How do we define ourselves and what are the systems in place to let others participate and create with us.

How connected are we, and to whom?

We’re a growing organisation, how do we keep being connected to what’s happening around us?

Understanding our role as a learning organisation and how we engage with formal and informal education.

Working with our neighbors, partners and creative businesses throughout the region in further building a sustainable and connected network.

We want everyone to feel included, so do we do that? From working with the Deaf community to making the very building we operate in accessible to everyone, we’re making plans to engage with as many people as we can, sharing and learning as we go.

How we engage, from social media, blogs, and our website. We believe we’re an approachable organisation, so how do we build on this?

Engaging our membership. We want to create the spaces for our memberships to input into the running of the organisation as well as create the spaces needed to network with one another.

We want to centre community and creativity at the heart of the region’s future. Who else can we work with to do this?

In the wake of the pandemic, what can we learn from this and how do we create new work which resonates and belongs to our communities locally?

As a learning organisation, we’re building the skills and confidence of those we engage, and those we collaborate with. How do we expand on this? And can we offer more platforms, roles and opportunities for our community to shine?

Who owns what? What does ownership mean for our community, and how do we ensure everyone is involved? What does the shift from private to community-owned mean, and can what we learn, in order to change things at a higher level?

As always, if you have any thoughts that might help us in our direction, our (digital) door is always open. Drop us a message on our social media, ask to speak with someone at the café, or send an email along.

Stay up to date by following the Stove Network on:

Facebook

Instagram

Twitter

Elsewhere

13th and 14th November
Running from 6-9pm daily

Discover a series of light-based artworks and film installations in Dumfries town centre, created by local artists, inspired by lockdown. A short walking route starting and ending at The Stove, 100 High Street.

Audiences are invited to visit Dumfries town centre to discover a series of temporary artworks and film installations. Elsewhere is a playful investigation into our changed relationship with public space as a result of covid-19.
To begin, head to the Stove café for information about the route and the artworks. The Stove café will be open until 8pm for hot drinks and a tasty vegetable stew, so after you have explored Elsewhere, pop back and warm up. Some of the artists and organisers will be on hand to share further information.
Movement around the artworks is free and unguided, but stewards will be on hand for safety, social distancing and information about the artworks. Each work is no more than six minutes in length, so audiences are encouraged to travel between the works whilst observing social distancing guidelines. There is no sign up required, but a short wait may be required to view some works.

‘The High Street is somewhere we though we knew, and now it’s different, it’s elsewhere.’ Atlas Pandemica

Elsewhere is the conclusion of a four month project, with a series of artworks and film installations in unexpected corners of the town centre over the weekend of 13th and 14th November, 6-9pm on and around Dumfries High Street.
Films will be projected onto windows and walls of spaces in the town centre. The content of the film artworks comes from the Elsewhere team of artists and have all been developed through the period of the pandemic.
Elsewhere is a creative research project led by artists exploring public space during a time when we as a community are learning to live with the effects of covid-19 on our sense of place. Elsewhere takes place between July and November 2020.
The Elsewhere team will be making artworks, in Dumfries town centre, that experiment with new forms of communal experience, gathering and exchange. We want to encourage people to pause whilst out beyond the confines of our homes, and at all times of day, inviting audiences to make tentative steps back into their town centres and high streets.
Elsewhere is a project led by The Stove Network, with support from the Midsteeple Quarter (community-led regeneration project for Dumfries High Street) and is contributing towards The Stove’s Atlas Pandemica project (10 collaborations with different communities that have responded to the pandemic.)

Elsewhere

13th and 14th November
Running from 6-9pm daily

Discover a series of light-based artworks and film installations in Dumfries town centre, created by local artists, inspired by lockdown. A short walking route starting and ending at The Stove, 100 High Street.

Audiences are invited to visit Dumfries town centre to discover a series of temporary artworks and film installations. Elsewhere is a playful investigation into our changed relationship with public space as a result of covid-19.
To begin, head to the Stove café for information about the route and the artworks. The Stove café will be open until 8pm for hot drinks and a tasty vegetable stew, so after you have explored Elsewhere, pop back and warm up. Some of the artists and organisers will be on hand to share further information.
Movement around the artworks is free and unguided, but stewards will be on hand for safety, social distancing and information about the artworks. Each work is no more than six minutes in length, so audiences are encouraged to travel between the works whilst observing social distancing guidelines. There is no sign up required, but a short wait may be required to view some works.

‘The High Street is somewhere we though we knew, and now it’s different, it’s elsewhere.’ Atlas Pandemica

Elsewhere is the conclusion of a four month project, with a series of artworks and film installations in unexpected corners of the town centre over the weekend of 13th and 14th November, 6-9pm on and around Dumfries High Street.
Films will be projected onto windows and walls of spaces in the town centre. The content of the film artworks comes from the Elsewhere team of artists and have all been developed through the period of the pandemic.
Elsewhere is a creative research project led by artists exploring public space during a time when we as a community are learning to live with the effects of covid-19 on our sense of place. Elsewhere takes place between July and November 2020.
The Elsewhere team will be making artworks, in Dumfries town centre, that experiment with new forms of communal experience, gathering and exchange. We want to encourage people to pause whilst out beyond the confines of our homes, and at all times of day, inviting audiences to make tentative steps back into their town centres and high streets.
Elsewhere is a project led by The Stove Network, with support from the Midsteeple Quarter (community-led regeneration project for Dumfries High Street) and is contributing towards The Stove’s Atlas Pandemica project (10 collaborations with different communities that have responded to the pandemic.)

Elsewhere

13th and 14th November
Running from 6-9pm daily

Discover a series of light-based artworks and film installations in Dumfries town centre, created by local artists, inspired by lockdown. A short walking route starting and ending at The Stove, 100 High Street.

Audiences are invited to visit Dumfries town centre to discover a series of temporary artworks and film installations. Elsewhere is a playful investigation into our changed relationship with public space as a result of covid-19.
To begin, head to the Stove café for information about the route and the artworks. The Stove café will be open until 8pm for hot drinks and a tasty vegetable stew, so after you have explored Elsewhere, pop back and warm up. Some of the artists and organisers will be on hand to share further information.
Movement around the artworks is free and unguided, but stewards will be on hand for safety, social distancing and information about the artworks. Each work is no more than six minutes in length, so audiences are encouraged to travel between the works whilst observing social distancing guidelines. There is no sign up required, but a short wait may be required to view some works.

‘The High Street is somewhere we though we knew, and now it’s different, it’s elsewhere.’ Atlas Pandemica

Elsewhere is the conclusion of a four month project, with a series of artworks and film installations in unexpected corners of the town centre over the weekend of 13th and 14th November, 6-9pm on and around Dumfries High Street.
Films will be projected onto windows and walls of spaces in the town centre. The content of the film artworks comes from the Elsewhere team of artists and have all been developed through the period of the pandemic.
Elsewhere is a creative research project led by artists exploring public space during a time when we as a community are learning to live with the effects of covid-19 on our sense of place. Elsewhere takes place between July and November 2020.
The Elsewhere team will be making artworks, in Dumfries town centre, that experiment with new forms of communal experience, gathering and exchange. We want to encourage people to pause whilst out beyond the confines of our homes, and at all times of day, inviting audiences to make tentative steps back into their town centres and high streets.
Elsewhere is a project led by The Stove Network, with support from the Midsteeple Quarter (community-led regeneration project for Dumfries High Street) and is contributing towards The Stove’s Atlas Pandemica project (10 collaborations with different communities that have responded to the pandemic.)

Elsewhere

13th and 14th November
Running from 6-9pm daily

Discover a series of light-based artworks and film installations in Dumfries town centre, created by local artists, inspired by lockdown. A short walking route starting and ending at The Stove, 100 High Street.

Audiences are invited to visit Dumfries town centre to discover a series of temporary artworks and film installations. Elsewhere is a playful investigation into our changed relationship with public space as a result of covid-19.
To begin, head to the Stove café for information about the route and the artworks. The Stove café will be open until 8pm for hot drinks and a tasty vegetable stew, so after you have explored Elsewhere, pop back and warm up. Some of the artists and organisers will be on hand to share further information.
Movement around the artworks is free and unguided, but stewards will be on hand for safety, social distancing and information about the artworks. Each work is no more than six minutes in length, so audiences are encouraged to travel between the works whilst observing social distancing guidelines. There is no sign up required, but a short wait may be required to view some works.

‘The High Street is somewhere we though we knew, and now it’s different, it’s elsewhere.’ Atlas Pandemica

Elsewhere is the conclusion of a four month project, with a series of artworks and film installations in unexpected corners of the town centre over the weekend of 13th and 14th November, 6-9pm on and around Dumfries High Street.
Films will be projected onto windows and walls of spaces in the town centre. The content of the film artworks comes from the Elsewhere team of artists and have all been developed through the period of the pandemic.
Elsewhere is a creative research project led by artists exploring public space during a time when we as a community are learning to live with the effects of covid-19 on our sense of place. Elsewhere takes place between July and November 2020.
The Elsewhere team will be making artworks, in Dumfries town centre, that experiment with new forms of communal experience, gathering and exchange. We want to encourage people to pause whilst out beyond the confines of our homes, and at all times of day, inviting audiences to make tentative steps back into their town centres and high streets.
Elsewhere is a project led by The Stove Network, with support from the Midsteeple Quarter (community-led regeneration project for Dumfries High Street) and is contributing towards The Stove’s Atlas Pandemica project (10 collaborations with different communities that have responded to the pandemic.)

Elsewhere

13th and 14th November
Running from 6-9pm daily

Discover a series of light-based artworks and film installations in Dumfries town centre, created by local artists, inspired by lockdown. A short walking route starting and ending at The Stove, 100 High Street.

Audiences are invited to visit Dumfries town centre to discover a series of temporary artworks and film installations. Elsewhere is a playful investigation into our changed relationship with public space as a result of covid-19.
To begin, head to the Stove café for information about the route and the artworks. The Stove café will be open until 8pm for hot drinks and a tasty vegetable stew, so after you have explored Elsewhere, pop back and warm up. Some of the artists and organisers will be on hand to share further information.
Movement around the artworks is free and unguided, but stewards will be on hand for safety, social distancing and information about the artworks. Each work is no more than six minutes in length, so audiences are encouraged to travel between the works whilst observing social distancing guidelines. There is no sign up required, but a short wait may be required to view some works.

‘The High Street is somewhere we though we knew, and now it’s different, it’s elsewhere.’ Atlas Pandemica

Elsewhere is the conclusion of a four month project, with a series of artworks and film installations in unexpected corners of the town centre over the weekend of 13th and 14th November, 6-9pm on and around Dumfries High Street.
Films will be projected onto windows and walls of spaces in the town centre. The content of the film artworks comes from the Elsewhere team of artists and have all been developed through the period of the pandemic.

Elsewhere is a creative research project led by artists exploring public space during a time when we as a community are learning to live with the effects of covid-19 on our sense of place. Elsewhere takes place between July and November 2020.
The Elsewhere team will be making artworks, in Dumfries town centre, that experiment with new forms of communal experience, gathering and exchange. We want to encourage people to pause whilst out beyond the confines of our homes, and at all times of day, inviting audiences to make tentative steps back into their town centres and high streets.
Elsewhere is a project led by The Stove Network, with support from the Midsteeple Quarter (community-led regeneration project for Dumfries High Street) and is contributing towards The Stove’s Atlas Pandemica project (10 collaborations with different communities that have responded to the pandemic.)

Elsewhere

13th and 14th November
Running from 6-9pm daily

Discover a series of light-based artworks and film installations in Dumfries town centre, created by local artists, inspired by lockdown. A short walking route starting and ending at The Stove, 100 High Street.

Audiences are invited to visit Dumfries town centre to discover a series of temporary artworks and film installations. Elsewhere is a playful investigation into our changed relationship with public space as a result of covid-19.
To begin, head to the Stove café for information about the route and the artworks. The Stove café will be open until 8pm for hot drinks and a tasty vegetable stew, so after you have explored Elsewhere, pop back and warm up. Some of the artists and organisers will be on hand to share further information.
Movement around the artworks is free and unguided, but stewards will be on hand for safety, social distancing and information about the artworks. Each work is no more than six minutes in length, so audiences are encouraged to travel between the works whilst observing social distancing guidelines. There is no sign up required, but a short wait may be required to view some works.

‘The High Street is somewhere we though we knew, and now it’s different, it’s elsewhere.’ Atlas Pandemica

Elsewhere is the conclusion of a four month project, with a series of artworks and film installations in unexpected corners of the town centre over the weekend of 13th and 14th November, 6-9pm on and around Dumfries High Street.
Films will be projected onto windows and walls of spaces in the town centre. The content of the film artworks comes from the Elsewhere team of artists and have all been developed through the period of the pandemic.
Elsewhere is a creative research project led by artists exploring public space during a time when we as a community are learning to live with the effects of covid-19 on our sense of place. Elsewhere takes place between July and November 2020.
The Elsewhere team will be making artworks, in Dumfries town centre, that experiment with new forms of communal experience, gathering and exchange. We want to encourage people to pause whilst out beyond the confines of our homes, and at all times of day, inviting audiences to make tentative steps back into their town centres and high streets.
Elsewhere is a project led by The Stove Network, with support from the Midsteeple Quarter (community-led regeneration project for Dumfries High Street) and is contributing towards The Stove’s Atlas Pandemica project (10 collaborations with different communities that have responded to the pandemic.)