Dumfries Tower of Light *CANCELLED*

In line with the current restrictions, and the rising cases of Covid-19 both in the region and nationally, we have taken the difficult decision to cancel the planned Tower of Light for the time being.
We’ll look forward to bringing some light and activity to the town centre when it is safe to do so. In the meantime we hope you will be able to keep close to home, and mark the turning of these dark winter evenings as we move slowly back into a lighter time of year.

About Dumfries Tower of Light

Join us at the Dumfries Museum and Camera Obscura for the spectacular Tower Of Light, a gentle midwinter celebration for all the family to enjoy. The iconic Windmill Tower will be illuminated by 1,000 candles for one night only and you’re invited to come along, make a wish and shine a light in the darkness of midwinter.
The Tower of Light will illuminate the Windmill Tower at 5pm on Sunday 10th January, running until 7.30pm. Audiences are invited to visit the site throughout the day to observe the installation and come back as darkness falls to see the full effect of the installation.
Visitors to the Midwinter Tower of Light are encouraged to add to the installation by reflecting on 2020 leave their own ‘message of hope’, to mark a significant moment in this year. As we step out of the dark and into a New Year and what looks to be a new beginning, it is hoped that the Tower of Light will be a way to connect the community and bring hope to those who visit, despite the difficulties the year has brought to everyone.

Visiting Dumfries Tower of Light

The visual artwork is fully accessible and there will be social-distancing measures in place. No booking is required, but stewards will be on hand to maintain safe social distancing throughout. If you are unable to make it along to the museum grounds, the installation will also be streamed online so that everyone can access the event.

Full details about the live stream will be announced shortly.

Please note that due to Covid-19 restrictions the museum building will not be open during the Tower of Light event. There will be a one way system in place to allow safe visiting of the illumination which involves entry to the museum grounds from the corner of Church and Primrose Streets and access via the garden steps to the level of the Windmill Tower. An accessible alternative route is available for visitors with limited mobility, and stewards will be on hand at all times to guide visitors.

Car Parking and Access

There will be 8 disabled parking spaces inside the main gate of the museum (at the corner of Rotchell Road and Church Street) and an alternative access route for visitors with limited mobility and wheelchair users.

All other visitors arriving by car are kindly asked to park either on the Whitesands or Mill Road car parks and take a short walk up the hill to the museum.

Further Information and Contact Details

Midwinter Tower of Light is produced by The Stove Network in partnership with Dumfries Museum and Dumfries and Galloway Council.
For press information please contact Kirstin@thestove.org
For other information please contact Katie@thestove.org

Categories
News

Elsewhere: First Images

Thank you to everyone who took some time to visit Elsewhere last weekend, it filled us with hope to see the town again from fresh perspectives and in new lights.

The first of our images from the weekend are now available, thanks to photographer Kirstin McEwan.

If you weren’t able to attend in person, much of the wonderful work we included as part of Elsewhere is available to view online, see a selection of links below.

Elsewhere was supported by Dumfries and Galloway Council’s Regional Arts Fund.

Categories
News

Messages: Elsewhere Installation

Messages is a new artwork installation created by artist Helen Walsh, and sited in the windows of 113-115 High Street, Dumfries.
The installation will be on view from Monday 21st September to Monday, 19th October.

Messages

“We use envelopes to send mesages, to communicate, to share our ideas, our secrets, our hopes and dreams. Envelope also means to wrap and protect and in my installation I want to look at both these ideas. These envelopes represent some of my hopes, dreams and fears for us post Covid-19.

I’ve made the envelopes from transparent paper so you can see some of the contents, a sharing of my hopes, dreams and fears. I hope you’ll share some of yours with me by taking an envelope from the box provided, working on it and then returning it to us at The Stove Network so we can add it to the installation.”

Get Involved

To get involved collect an envelope from either 113-115 High Street, or The Stove cafe and share your hopes and ideas of what life should be like after the Covid-19 pandemic. You can share these ideas however you like, drawings, words or another way – and return it to the Stove cafe addressed to ELSEWHERE. Alternatively, if you are based outwith the town centre, post us your ideas to ELSEWHERE, The Stove, 100 High Street, Dumfries. Envelopes should not be larger than C5.

Elsewhere

“The High Street is somewhere we thought we knew, and now it’s different, it’s elsewhere.”

Elsewhere is a research project by The Stove Network that looks to locate creative activity in the High Street of Dumfries as a means of exploring public space during a time when we as a community are responding to, and recovering from, the effects of COVID on our sense of place.

Helen Walsh is an artist and creative practitioner living on the Solway Coast. Helen specialises in drawing and textiles, particularly embroidery. Helen is continually fascinated by the natural world and our connection to it. Find out more about Helen and her work online here

Helen’s work is located in 113-115 High Street, a property recently purchased by Midsteeple Quarter. Find out more about the project here

Elsewhere is part of Atlas Pandemica. Find out more here

Reel to Real Cinema At Home: Colonial Monuments Shorts

Friday, 14th August 2020 / Watch live from 8pm

Discussion on Crowdcast 9.30pm-10pm

 
This month, we are bringing you a series of four short films that we have sourced online exploring broadly the theme of Colonial Monuments. Public art and memorial sculpture entered the conversation internationally last month when across Europe and America, statues became one of the focuses for attention during Black Lives Matter protests, notably when the statue of Edward Colston was pulled from it’s plinth in Bristol and deposited in the docks by activists.
Through these four films sourced online, we’d like to explore how these colonial monuments exist as representations of political power and cultural authority from the streets of Limerick, Ireland to Mechelen, Belgium and Kinshasa in the Democratic Republic of Congo and Cacheu in Guinea Bissau. This is a global story and we look forward to sharing conversations with you about the past, present and future of the monument in public art.

About Reel to Real Cinema At Home

As we look to explore how we can use collective film watching at home as a means to gather, share ideas and connect we’ve been delving through the vastness of the internet to source interesting and relevant stories for now, on film. Reel to Real continues to share a film and discussion evening on the second Friday of the month online, until we are able to return safely to our High Street home in The Stove, Dumfries.

How to Watch

The film will be made available here, on this page at 8pm on Friday, 14th August – please just re-fresh the page at the time and it will appear.
We’d also love if you could stay for a discussion about the film, and some of the important themes arising from it, which will take place using Crowdcast also on this page, at 9.30pm on Friday, 4th August.  Please register in advance by clicking here.
There will be a live chat in the run up to and during the film, so let us know that you are watching and any questions you have!
For more information contact katie@thestove.org.
 

About This Months Films

 
A History of Stone, Origin and Myth                               22 minutes
Tom Flanagan and Megs Morley
A non-narrative film essay draws unlikely connections between the creations of monuments, the material of stone and the creation of memory and power. These monuments exist as public representations of political power and cultural authority, providing visual allegories of the attempt to carve collective memory into certain histories, often through the forgetting or erasing of other histories.
Cacheu (2012)                                                                     10 minutes
Directed by Filipa César
A science fiction lecture looking back at four colonial sculptures which are stored at the Fortress of Cacheu, one of the first bastions constructed by the Portuguese in 1588 in order to facilitate the slave trade in the West African country of Guinea Bissau.
Échangeur                                                                             33 minutes
Anne Reijniers & Rob Jacobs
In the streets of the metropolis of Kinshasa, young Congolese imagine their version of the colonial past. Around an empty pedestal that once carried a Belgian monument emerges an imaginary city where archival footage, performances and present-day Kinshasa interact.
(Pas) Mon Pays (Not) My Country                                   9.50 minutes
Bie Michels
A short fillm in two parts – the first of a colonial monument in Mechelen, Antwerp and Michel’s efforts to decolonise this statue with a group of Belgian citizens with Congolese roots, and the second sharing the artist’s visit to Congo based on her personal history. The film is an attempot to let the past encounter the present and see further into the future of the postcolonial situation in both Congo and Mechelen.
 

The Film

The film links will appear here at 8pm on Friday, 14th August – please re-fresh your page at this time to view.

Reel to Real Cinema At Home: Colonial Monuments Shorts

Friday, 14th August 2020 / Watch live from 8pm

Discussion on Crowdcast 9.30pm-10pm

 
This month, we are bringing you a series of four short films that we have sourced online exploring broadly the theme of Colonial Monuments. Public art and memorial sculpture entered the conversation internationally last month when across Europe and America, statues became one of the focuses for attention during Black Lives Matter protests, notably when the statue of Edward Colston was pulled from it’s plinth in Bristol and deposited in the docks by activists.
Through these four films sourced online, we’d like to explore how these colonial monuments exist as representations of political power and cultural authority from the streets of Limerick, Ireland to Mechelen, Belgium and Kinshasa in the Democratic Republic of Congo and Cacheu in Guinea Bissau. This is a global story and we look forward to sharing conversations with you about the past, present and future of the monument in public art.

About Reel to Real Cinema At Home

As we look to explore how we can use collective film watching at home as a means to gather, share ideas and connect we’ve been delving through the vastness of the internet to source interesting and relevant stories for now, on film. Reel to Real continues to share a film and discussion evening on the second Friday of the month online, until we are able to return safely to our High Street home in The Stove, Dumfries.

How to Watch

The film will be made available here, on this page at 8pm on Friday, 14th August – please just re-fresh the page at the time and it will appear.
We’d also love if you could stay for a discussion about the film, and some of the important themes arising from it, which will take place using Crowdcast also on this page, at 9.30pm on Friday, 4th August.  Please register in advance by clicking here.
There will be a live chat in the run up to and during the film, so let us know that you are watching and any questions you have!
For more information contact katie@thestove.org.
 

About This Months Films

 
A History of Stone, Origin and Myth                               22 minutes
Tom Flanagan and Megs Morley
A non-narrative film essay draws unlikely connections between the creations of monuments, the material of stone and the creation of memory and power. These monuments exist as public representations of political power and cultural authority, providing visual allegories of the attempt to carve collective memory into certain histories, often through the forgetting or erasing of other histories.
Cacheu (2012)                                                                     10 minutes
Directed by Filipa César
A science fiction lecture looking back at four colonial sculptures which are stored at the Fortress of Cacheu, one of the first bastions constructed by the Portuguese in 1588 in order to facilitate the slave trade in the West African country of Guinea Bissau.
Échangeur                                                                             33 minutes
Anne Reijniers & Rob Jacobs
In the streets of the metropolis of Kinshasa, young Congolese imagine their version of the colonial past. Around an empty pedestal that once carried a Belgian monument emerges an imaginary city where archival footage, performances and present-day Kinshasa interact.
(Pas) Mon Pays  (Not) My Country                                     9.50 minutes
Bie Michels
A short fillm in two parts – the first of a colonial monument in Mechelen, Antwerp and Michel’s efforts to decolonise this statue with a group of Belgian citizens with Congolese roots, and the second sharing the artist’s visit to Congo based on her personal history. The film is an attempt to let the past encounter the present and see further into the future of the postcolonial situation in both Congo and Mechelen.

The Film

The film links will appear here at 8pm on Friday, 14th August – please re-fresh your page at this time to view.

The Discussion

powered by Crowdcast

Reel to Real Cinema At Home: Colonial Monuments Shorts

Friday, 14th August 2020 / Watch live from 8pm

Discussion on Crowdcast 9.30pm-10pm

This month, we are bringing you a series of four short films that we have sourced online exploring broadly the theme of Colonial Monuments. Public art and memorial sculpture entered the conversation internationally last month when across Europe and America, statues became one of the focuses for attention during Black Lives Matter protests, notably when the statue of Edward Colston was pulled from it’s plinth in Bristol and deposited in the docks by activists.
Through these four films sourced online, we’d like to explore how these colonial monuments exist as representations of political power and cultural authority from the streets of Limerick, Ireland to Mechelen, Belgium and Kinshasa in the Democratic Republic of Congo and Cacheu in Guinea Bissau. This is a global story and we look forward to sharing conversations with you about the past, present and future of the monument in public art.

About Reel to Real Cinema At Home

As we look to explore how we can use collective film watching at home as a means to gather, share ideas and connect we’ve been delving through the vastness of the internet to source interesting and relevant stories for now, on film. Reel to Real continues to share a film and discussion evening on the second Friday of the month online, until we are able to return safely to our High Street home in The Stove, Dumfries.

How to Watch

The film will be made available here, on this page at 8pm on Friday, 14th August – please just re-fresh the page at the time and it will appear.
We’d also love if you could stay for a discussion about the film, and some of the important themes arising from it, which will take place using Crowdcast also on this page, at 9.30pm on Friday, 4th August.  Please register in advance by clicking here.
There will be a live chat in the run up to and during the film, so let us know that you are watching and any questions you have!
For more information contact katie@thestove.org.
 

About This Months Films

 
A History of Stone, Origin and Myth                               22 minutes
Tom Flanagan and Megs Morley
A non-narrative film essay draws unlikely connections between the creations of monuments, the material of stone and the creation of memory and power. These monuments exist as public representations of political power and cultural authority, providing visual allegories of the attempt to carve collective memory into certain histories, often through the forgetting or erasing of other histories.
Cacheu (2012)                                                                     10 minutes
Directed by Filipa César
A science fiction lecture looking back at four colonial sculptures which are stored at the Fortress of Cacheu, one of the first bastions constructed by the Portuguese in 1588 in order to facilitate the slave trade in the West African country of Guinea Bissau.
Échangeur                                                                             33 minutes
Anne Reijniers & Rob Jacobs
In the streets of the metropolis of Kinshasa, young Congolese imagine their version of the colonial past. Around an empty pedestal that once carried a Belgian monument emerges an imaginary city where archival footage, performances and present-day Kinshasa interact.
(Pas) Mon Pays  (Not) My Country                                     9.50 minutes
Bie Michels
A short fillm in two parts – the first of a colonial monument in Mechelen, Antwerp and Michel’s efforts to decolonise this statue with a group of Belgian citizens with Congolese roots, and the second sharing the artist’s visit to Congo based on her personal history. The film is an attempt to let the past encounter the present and see further into the future of the postcolonial situation in both Congo and Mechelen.

The Films

This months films will be available for one month once they have gone live.
 

The Discussion

powered by Crowdcast

Reel to Real Cinema At Home: Colonial Monuments Shorts

Friday, 14th August 2020 / Watch live from 8pm

Discussion on Crowdcast 9.30pm-10pm

This month, we are bringing you a series of four short films that we have sourced online exploring broadly the theme of Colonial Monuments. Public art and memorial sculpture entered the conversation internationally last month when across Europe and America, statues became one of the focuses for attention during Black Lives Matter protests, notably when the statue of Edward Colston was pulled from it’s plinth in Bristol and deposited in the docks by activists.
Through these four films sourced online, we’d like to explore how these colonial monuments exist as representations of political power and cultural authority from the streets of Limerick, Ireland to Mechelen, Belgium and Kinshasa in the Democratic Republic of Congo and Cacheu in Guinea Bissau. This is a global story and we look forward to sharing conversations with you about the past, present and future of the monument in public art.

About Reel to Real Cinema At Home

As we look to explore how we can use collective film watching at home as a means to gather, share ideas and connect we’ve been delving through the vastness of the internet to source interesting and relevant stories for now, on film. Reel to Real continues to share a film and discussion evening on the second Friday of the month online, until we are able to return safely to our High Street home in The Stove, Dumfries.

How to Watch

The film will be made available here, on this page at 8pm on Friday, 14th August – please just re-fresh the page at the time and it will appear.
We’d also love if you could stay for a discussion about the film, and some of the important themes arising from it, which will take place using Crowdcast also on this page, at 9.30pm on Friday, 4th August.  Please register in advance by clicking here.
There will be a live chat in the run up to and during the film, so let us know that you are watching and any questions you have!
For more information contact katie@thestove.org.
 

About This Months Films

 
A History of Stone, Origin and Myth                               22 minutes
Tom Flanagan and Megs Morley
A non-narrative film essay draws unlikely connections between the creations of monuments, the material of stone and the creation of memory and power. These monuments exist as public representations of political power and cultural authority, providing visual allegories of the attempt to carve collective memory into certain histories, often through the forgetting or erasing of other histories.
Cacheu (2012)                                                                     10 minutes
Directed by Filipa César
A science fiction lecture looking back at four colonial sculptures which are stored at the Fortress of Cacheu, one of the first bastions constructed by the Portuguese in 1588 in order to facilitate the slave trade in the West African country of Guinea Bissau.
Échangeur                                                                             33 minutes
Anne Reijniers & Rob Jacobs
In the streets of the metropolis of Kinshasa, young Congolese imagine their version of the colonial past. Around an empty pedestal that once carried a Belgian monument emerges an imaginary city where archival footage, performances and present-day Kinshasa interact.
(Pas) Mon Pays  (Not) My Country                                     9.50 minutes
Bie Michels
A short fillm in two parts – the first of a colonial monument in Mechelen, Antwerp and Michel’s efforts to decolonise this statue with a group of Belgian citizens with Congolese roots, and the second sharing the artist’s visit to Congo based on her personal history. The film is an attempt to let the past encounter the present and see further into the future of the postcolonial situation in both Congo and Mechelen.

The Films

This months films will be available for one month once they have gone live.
 

The Discussion

powered by Crowdcast

Reel to Real Cinema At Home: Colonial Monuments Shorts

Friday, 14th August 2020 / Watch live from 8pm

Discussion on Crowdcast 9.30pm-10pm

This month, we are bringing you a series of four short films that we have sourced online exploring broadly the theme of Colonial Monuments. Public art and memorial sculpture entered the conversation internationally last month when across Europe and America, statues became one of the focuses for attention during Black Lives Matter protests, notably when the statue of Edward Colston was pulled from it’s plinth in Bristol and deposited in the docks by activists.
Through these four films sourced online, we’d like to explore how these colonial monuments exist as representations of political power and cultural authority from the streets of Limerick, Ireland to Mechelen, Belgium and Kinshasa in the Democratic Republic of Congo and Cacheu in Guinea Bissau. This is a global story and we look forward to sharing conversations with you about the past, present and future of the monument in public art.

About Reel to Real Cinema At Home

As we look to explore how we can use collective film watching at home as a means to gather, share ideas and connect we’ve been delving through the vastness of the internet to source interesting and relevant stories for now, on film. Reel to Real continues to share a film and discussion evening on the second Friday of the month online, until we are able to return safely to our High Street home in The Stove, Dumfries.

How to Watch

The film will be made available here, on this page at 8pm on Friday, 14th August – please just re-fresh the page at the time and it will appear.
We’d also love if you could stay for a discussion about the film, and some of the important themes arising from it, which will take place using Crowdcast also on this page, at 9.30pm on Friday, 4th August.  Please register in advance by clicking here.
There will be a live chat in the run up to and during the film, so let us know that you are watching and any questions you have!
For more information contact katie@thestove.org.
 

About This Months Films

 
A History of Stone, Origin and Myth                               22 minutes
Tom Flanagan and Megs Morley
A non-narrative film essay draws unlikely connections between the creations of monuments, the material of stone and the creation of memory and power. These monuments exist as public representations of political power and cultural authority, providing visual allegories of the attempt to carve collective memory into certain histories, often through the forgetting or erasing of other histories.
Cacheu (2012)                                                                     10 minutes
Directed by Filipa César
A science fiction lecture looking back at four colonial sculptures which are stored at the Fortress of Cacheu, one of the first bastions constructed by the Portuguese in 1588 in order to facilitate the slave trade in the West African country of Guinea Bissau.
Échangeur                                                                             33 minutes
Anne Reijniers & Rob Jacobs
In the streets of the metropolis of Kinshasa, young Congolese imagine their version of the colonial past. Around an empty pedestal that once carried a Belgian monument emerges an imaginary city where archival footage, performances and present-day Kinshasa interact.
(Pas) Mon Pays  (Not) My Country                                     9.50 minutes
Bie Michels
A short fillm in two parts – the first of a colonial monument in Mechelen, Antwerp and Michel’s efforts to decolonise this statue with a group of Belgian citizens with Congolese roots, and the second sharing the artist’s visit to Congo based on her personal history. The film is an attempt to let the past encounter the present and see further into the future of the postcolonial situation in both Congo and Mechelen.

The Films

This months films will be available for one month once they have gone live.
 

The Discussion

powered by Crowdcast

Reel to Real Cinema At Home: Colonial Monuments Shorts

Friday, 14th August 2020 / Watch live from 8pm

Discussion on Crowdcast 9.30pm-10pm

This month, we are bringing you a series of four short films that we have sourced online exploring broadly the theme of Colonial Monuments. Public art and memorial sculpture entered the conversation internationally last month when across Europe and America, statues became one of the focuses for attention during Black Lives Matter protests, notably when the statue of Edward Colston was pulled from it’s plinth in Bristol and deposited in the docks by activists.
Through these four films sourced online, we’d like to explore how these colonial monuments exist as representations of political power and cultural authority from the streets of Limerick, Ireland to Mechelen, Belgium and Kinshasa in the Democratic Republic of Congo and Cacheu in Guinea Bissau. This is a global story and we look forward to sharing conversations with you about the past, present and future of the monument in public art.

About Reel to Real Cinema At Home

As we look to explore how we can use collective film watching at home as a means to gather, share ideas and connect we’ve been delving through the vastness of the internet to source interesting and relevant stories for now, on film. Reel to Real continues to share a film and discussion evening on the second Friday of the month online, until we are able to return safely to our High Street home in The Stove, Dumfries.

How to Watch

The film will be made available here, on this page at 8pm on Friday, 14th August – please just re-fresh the page at the time and it will appear.
We’d also love if you could stay for a discussion about the film, and some of the important themes arising from it, which will take place using Crowdcast also on this page, at 9.30pm on Friday, 4th August.  Please register in advance by clicking here.
There will be a live chat in the run up to and during the film, so let us know that you are watching and any questions you have!
For more information contact katie@thestove.org.
 

About This Months Films

 
A History of Stone, Origin and Myth                               22 minutes
Tom Flanagan and Megs Morley
A non-narrative film essay draws unlikely connections between the creations of monuments, the material of stone and the creation of memory and power. These monuments exist as public representations of political power and cultural authority, providing visual allegories of the attempt to carve collective memory into certain histories, often through the forgetting or erasing of other histories.
Cacheu (2012)                                                                     10 minutes
Directed by Filipa César
A science fiction lecture looking back at four colonial sculptures which are stored at the Fortress of Cacheu, one of the first bastions constructed by the Portuguese in 1588 in order to facilitate the slave trade in the West African country of Guinea Bissau.
Échangeur                                                                             33 minutes
Anne Reijniers & Rob Jacobs
In the streets of the metropolis of Kinshasa, young Congolese imagine their version of the colonial past. Around an empty pedestal that once carried a Belgian monument emerges an imaginary city where archival footage, performances and present-day Kinshasa interact.
(Pas) Mon Pays  (Not) My Country                                     9.50 minutes
Bie Michels
A short fillm in two parts – the first of a colonial monument in Mechelen, Antwerp and Michel’s efforts to decolonise this statue with a group of Belgian citizens with Congolese roots, and the second sharing the artist’s visit to Congo based on her personal history. The film is an attempt to let the past encounter the present and see further into the future of the postcolonial situation in both Congo and Mechelen.

The Films

This months films will be available for one month once they have gone live.
 

The Discussion

powered by Crowdcast

Reel to Real Cinema At Home: Colonial Monuments Shorts

Friday, 14th August 2020 / Watch live from 8pm

Discussion on Crowdcast 9.30pm-10pm

This month, we are bringing you a series of four short films that we have sourced online exploring broadly the theme of Colonial Monuments. Public art and memorial sculpture entered the conversation internationally last month when across Europe and America, statues became one of the focuses for attention during Black Lives Matter protests, notably when the statue of Edward Colston was pulled from it’s plinth in Bristol and deposited in the docks by activists.

Through these four films sourced online, we’d like to explore how these colonial monuments exist as representations of political power and cultural authority from the streets of Limerick, Ireland to Mechelen, Belgium and Kinshasa in the Democratic Republic of Congo and Cacheu in Guinea Bissau. This is a global story and we look forward to sharing conversations with you about the past, present and future of the monument in public art.

About Reel to Real Cinema At Home

As we look to explore how we can use collective film watching at home as a means to gather, share ideas and connect we’ve been delving through the vastness of the internet to source interesting and relevant stories for now, on film. Reel to Real continues to share a film and discussion evening on the second Friday of the month online, until we are able to return safely to our High Street home in The Stove, Dumfries.

How to Watch

The film will be made available here, on this page at 8pm on Friday, 14th August – please just re-fresh the page at the time and it will appear.

We’d also love if you could stay for a discussion about the film, and some of the important themes arising from it, which will take place using Crowdcast also on this page, at 9.30pm on Friday, 4th August.  Please register in advance by clicking here.

There will be a live chat in the run up to and during the film, so let us know that you are watching and any questions you have!

For more information contact katie@thestove.org.

 

About This Months Films

 

A History of Stone, Origin and Myth                               22 minutes

Tom Flanagan and Megs Morley

A non-narrative film essay draws unlikely connections between the creations of monuments, the material of stone and the creation of memory and power. These monuments exist as public representations of political power and cultural authority, providing visual allegories of the attempt to carve collective memory into certain histories, often through the forgetting or erasing of other histories.

Cacheu (2012)                                                                     10 minutes

Directed by Filipa César

A science fiction lecture looking back at four colonial sculptures which are stored at the Fortress of Cacheu, one of the first bastions constructed by the Portuguese in 1588 in order to facilitate the slave trade in the West African country of Guinea Bissau.

Échangeur                                                                             33 minutes

Anne Reijniers & Rob Jacobs

In the streets of the metropolis of Kinshasa, young Congolese imagine their version of the colonial past. Around an empty pedestal that once carried a Belgian monument emerges an imaginary city where archival footage, performances and present-day Kinshasa interact.

(Pas) Mon Pays  (Not) My Country                                     9.50 minutes

Bie Michels

A short fillm in two parts – the first of a colonial monument in Mechelen, Antwerp and Michel’s efforts to decolonise this statue with a group of Belgian citizens with Congolese roots, and the second sharing the artist’s visit to Congo based on her personal history. The film is an attempt to let the past encounter the present and see further into the future of the postcolonial situation in both Congo and Mechelen.

The Films

This months films will be available for one month once they have gone live.

 

The Discussion

powered by Crowdcast